Bio Huma Netics, Inc.

BHN 2015-4QTR Newsletter

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Working the Global Economy In This Issue The Living Engine of Soil (Cont'd) ........... 2 BHN Provides Innovative Crop Nutrition Products to China ........................................2 Product Spotlight: SOIL-MAX™ and BORO-MAX ® ................. 3 New on the BHN Hub ................................ 3 Golf Course Profile ..................................... 4 Research: PROMAX ® on Stunt Nematodes in Turf ..............................................................4 Use of Biostimulants and Buffers for Upset Recovery in Paper Mill Wastewater Sytems ............................................................5 Video: How to Reduce SVI and Foam in Activated Sludge Plants ............................ 5 BHN 2015 European Conference in Spain ......6 Upcoming Trade Shows .............................6 4th Qtr 2015 A Quarterly Publication by BIO HUMA NETICS, Inc. The 68th UN General Assembly Declared 2015 the International Year of Soils "Agriculture must, literally, return to its roots by rediscovering the importance of healthy soil, drawing on natural sources of plant nutrition, and using mineral fertilizer wisely." -Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). The International Year of Soils (IYS) 2015 aims to increase awareness and understanding of the importance of soil for food security and essential ecosystem functions. "Living the life of abundance" must always begin with healthy soils. In fact, BHN echoes the FAO when we say that healthier life begins with healthier soils. Healthy soils are the foundation to agriculture and are essential as global demands rise for food, fuel, and fiber. Healthy soils are also important in facing the challenges of a growing population, climate change, and extreme weather events. What do healthy soils do? Healthy soils keep nutrients in the soil, increase organic matter, promote soil stability and structure, and improve water penetration and holding capacity. Our soil activator products are uniquely suited to rehabilitate soils to optimal health. In 2015, we celebrate the International Year of Soils by publishing a series of articles highlighting key aspects of soil science. In this issue, we have the third installment about the role of microorganisms in healthy soil. The next article in the series will discuss plant-soil microbial interactions. You might think early winter would be a slow time for us at Bio Huma Netics, with many U.S. harvests in and the fields lying dormant before spring planting, but in the global economy it's always growing season somewhere, and greenhouses and wastewater remediation know no seasons. (Plus, you can always golf in the great Southwest!) In this issue you'll find a number of articles that reflect BHN's increasing diversity in the global economy. On page 6 you'll find photos and a report on our recent BHN 2015 European Conference in Spain, which had over 200 attendees representing 12 countries. (Be sure to mark your calendars for our BHN 2016 World Conference to be held here in Gilbert, Ariz., next year on Nov. 1–4.) On page 2 is an article originally published in AgroPages that features our Huma Gro® product distribution srategy in China. On page 5 is a case study report on wastewater bioremediation at a pulp and paper mill in China using our Probiotic Solutions® products Bio Energizer® and Micatrol®. On the domestic front, page 4 features a pro- file of an Arizona golf course that uses our Huma Gro® Turf products and a University of Massachusetts research study on the effectiveness of our biopesticide, Promax®, on stunt nematodes in turf. ere's a lot going on in this abundant world, and we are pleased to be contributing our vision and products to its expanding marketplace. Microorganisms: The Living Engine of Soil by Larry Cooper, with Rita Abi-Ghanem, PhD In this third installment of our 2015 newsletter series on "Soil," we move from the inorganic structure and function of soil to the organic component of this wonderfully complex miniature ecosystem that is essential to successful farming. Walk out into a field and pick up a handful of soil (not "dirt," as we discussed in previous articles). You might be excused for thinking that you just have a handful of very small rocks. But look at it closely: if you dug deep for that handful you might see a few small insects and perhaps an earthworm or two. If the soil is rich, you'll probably also notice that some of those "small rocks" are actually bits of decomposing organic matter (from dead plants or animals). Now let's pull out a microscope, dial up the zoom, and take an even closer look. What you'll see might astound you: healthy soil is teeming with masses of tiny, active creatures (microorganisms, or microbes) that perform the essential work of making soil a suitable growth medium for plants. How Many, What Kind? When we say "teeming" we're not exaggerating. It's estimated that a teaspoon of soil can con- tain upwards of 50 billion microbes (for com- parison, there are about 7.3 billion humans on our entire planet). ey range from single-celled organisms to complex structures with special- ized body parts. ere are thousands of species of bacteria, hundreds of species of fungi and protozoa, dozens of species of nematodes, plus (Continued Next Page)

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